Points of Pride

Faculty and Staff Awards and Announcements

2016-2017

Jim Heise, Senior Lecturer and Design Projects Coordinator, continues to manage the growth of ME Capstone Senior Design Program, now up to 46 sponsored projects to support 86 teams; 35 of these projects were in direct support of Iowa manufacturers. Jim worked with the College of Engineering and Caterpillar to host a second industry crowd sourcing design event with 11 club teams participating; the Cyclone Space Mining Club receiving the grand prize for the best design solution. Jim was awarded “Outstanding Student Organization Adviser of the Year” by the Student Activities Center for his work with the Cyclone Space Mining Club. The club had another good year at NASA’s 7th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center placing 3rd overall out of 47 teams participating. The team took first in Best Use of Social Media, second in the Outreach Project Award (this is the fifth year in a row that ISU has placed in that category) and 5th place in on-site mining.

2015-2016

Emmanuel Agba and Team PrISUm brought home the gold with a 1st place victory at the 2015 Formula Sun Grand Prix, the best finish in Team PrISUm’s 25-year racing history. Phaëton, the team’s 12th solar car, dominated the competition with a commanding lead of 106 miles.

Daniel Attinger discovered a novel manufacturing process to modify the wettability of metallic surfaces, with applications to phase change heat transfer. Attinger proposed a new graduate class on Multiphase Microfluidics, and was elected faculty representative in the ME Department leadership committee. He also gave four invited scientific talks in the Shanghai area.

Xianglan Bai received two new research grants and renewed two grants. She published five journal papers, seven conference presentations, and filed two Intellectual Property disclousures.

In addition to publishing papers, introducing new graduate course in the ME curriculum and constructing a research program on computational nanoscience and materials modeling, Ganesh Balasubramanian was awarded an NSF grant as the PI to organize a conference on thermodynamics and statistical mechanics.

Jackie Baughman participated in the Presidential Flipped Classroom Initiative through a successful grant proposal to develop and implement a successful clipped classroom in ME 270 in fall 2015. She also led the Collaborative Learning Network Team which aims to develop a roadmap for multidisciplinary senior capstone experiences.

Sourabh Bhattacharya published seven peer-reviewed conference publications. Additionally, he published four journal papers and one book chapter. Bhattacharya also organized the Rise-of-Machines 2 competition for undergraduate ME students in ME 421. He also organized the Workshop in Robotics Excursion for K-12 students and served as Associate Editor for the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation.

Timothy Bigelow co-authored six journal papers and one conference paper. He has also expanded his research expertise into the area of non-destructive evaluation.

Robert Brown served as director of the Bioeconomy Institute at ISU, which conducted over $12 million in research in 2015. He also received the Don Klass Award for Excellence in Thermochemical Conversion Science and co-authored 25 peer-reviewed journal articles. In its 2015 Laboratory Performance Report Card the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science rated highly the Ames Laboratory’s Simulation, Modeling and Decision Science program led by Professor Mark Bryden for being at the “forefront” of the data management, information sciences, and materials programs fields. The Simulation, Modeling, Decision Science Program received an overall grade of A (4.0), the highest grade of any of the Ames Laboratory’s scientific programs. He also published five journal articles and seven peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

Abhijit Chandra published two papers generalizing mechanistic approaches to the broad field of Data Science and Data Driven Prognosis in Proc. Royal. Soc. London. A mixed strategy control system that obviates trade-off between material removal rate and planarization efficiency for Chemical Mechanical Polishing was developed. A plasma system facilitating buffing of ultra-hard materials (e.g., sapphire) was also developed.

The research laboratory of Prof. Jonathan Claussen, with the assistance of collaborators from Brigham Young University (BYU), published a research article in the high impact journal ACS Nano and featured in an Americal Chemical Society (ACS) podcast that introduced a method to use carbon nanotubes as catalyst for hydrogen peroxide fueled micro underwater vehicles (MUVS). Prof. Claussen obtain funding support from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust, the USDA, 360 Yield Center (industry partner), and the Catron Center for Solar Energy Research to develop an oral cancer diagnostics biosensor, in-field pesticide biosensor, in-field fertilizer sensor, and a flexible solar energy harverster with nanomaterials respectively in 2015. Prof. Claussen initiated outreach activities with the Des Moines Hoover High School where he visited with high school students and shared with them what motivated him to pursue higher education in a STEM field and pursue a career as a professor.

Sebastien Feve was an active member of the ME 270 Flipped Instructional Development Team (2015 President’s Flipped Classroom Initiative). ME 270 was offered as a flipped course for the first-time during Fall 2015 and he taught one section. He also taught and coordinated both ME 170 and ME 270 courses in Spring 2015. Lastly, ME 170 students are now exposed to reverse engineering (of a ball valve) by using 3D scanners in a new ME 170 course project, replacing the coffeemaker dissection project, while attempting to serve better ME’s current enrollment and lab space availability.

Baskar Ganapathysubramanian was selected as a PSI faculty Fellow. He also led a PIIR Big Data group. Throughout the year he published 12 journal papers and presented 15 conference talks.

Matthew Hagge was voted “Professor of the Year” by ME seniors demonstrating that ME students appreciate instructors with high standards, and instructors who attempt to prepare students for the real world, by teaching ME students to take responsibility for their own learning, and by teaching students how to work in a collaborative environment to turn in correct answers to their boss. Dr Hagge has developed an innovative teaching method called ‘Decision Based Learning’ where students learn to solve unfamiliar problems by connecting all their pieces of understanding through a set of instructor decisions. Dr Hagge also developed a tutor activity than has shown a statistically large amount of learning in every group of thermodynamic students ever tested, with more than 500 participants, through an NSF funded proposal with John Jackman, Stephen Gilbert, Gloria Starns, and LeAnn Faidley.

Nicole N Hashemi published nine manuscripts in high impact factor journals and I have delivered an invited seminar internationally. Her work was highlighted by news agencies such as the Ames Tribune and ChemistryViews. She and her graduate students received various fellowships and awards such as NSF EAPSI, LUSH Young Researcher Prize, Big 12 Faculty Fellowship, ISU Research/Teaching Excellence Award, Goldwater Scholarship, and ASME Best Poster Award.

Jim Heise organized 38 sponsored projects for the ME Capstone Senior Design Program to support 68 teams; 18 of these projects were in direct support of Iowa manufacturers. The Iowa economic impact of these projects is estimated by CIRAS to potentially be in the millions of dollars. Heise also worked with the College of Engineering to host the first industry crowd sourcing design event sponsor by Caterpillar Corporation. Seven student club teams participated with Team PrISUm receiving $2000 support for having the best design solution. As faculty advisor to the ISU Lunabotics Club (now Cyclone Space Mining Club) he guided the team had another successful year at NASA’s 6th Annual Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center placing 7th overall (out of 49 teams participating). The team took first place in Best Use of Social Media and Engineer It! Awards, and third in Outreach Project Award, the fourth year in a row that ISU has placed in that category.

Ming-Chen Hsu’s research group focused on developing a novel and transformative Fluid–Structure Interaction Analysis Framework for Engineering Designs. The framework has been applied to applications such as wind turbines, artificial heart valves, gas turbines, hydraulic arresting gears, and turbulent flow over complex geometries. He also published ten journal papers and gave 12 invited lectures.

Chao Hu co-authored a book entitled “Probabilistic Engineering Analysis and Design” to be published by Springer which provides an up-to-date, fully illustrated reference for students, researchers and professional engineers who are interested in exploring the fundamentals, implementation and applications of probabilistic analysis and design methods. Topics covered in the book include statistical data analysis, reliability analysis under time-independent and time dependent uncertainties, and system health diagnostics and prognostics.

Shan Hu said that major lab capability development for Nanomanufacturing and Renewable Energy Lab (NSEL) has been completed. Research results produced by members of NSEL have been disseminated through two published peer-review conference proceedings and two journal papers submitted. NSEL hosted four undergraduate students and one high school student for research experiences in renewable energy technology.

Jaime Juárez has built his laboratory since joining the ISU faculty in August 2015. He also recruited two graduate students and several undergraduates to conduct reserach in his lab. He has also worked to identify possible colaborations through the Microelectronics Research Center, the Center for Multiphase Flow Research, and with individual faculty members. Dr. Juárez also served on the Curriculum Development Committee for energy related courses.

Atul Kelkar is working on the forefronts of research on improving energy efficiencies in buildings and technologies for renewable energy. He is also impacting K-12 STEM education by developing innovative educational video games based on his years of experience in aerospace research. His contributions were featured in AIAA’s newsletter which is read worldwide. Dr. Kelkar published a NASA Paper jointly with NASA Senior Scientist on the control of asteroid capture spacecraft. His entrepreneurial efforts have not only led to positive economic impact and job creation for the state but have also benefited engineering faculty at Iowa State through research subcontracts through DoD STTR grants. He assumes a new position in ME as the Associate Chair for Research and Technology Transfer. He also held leadership position in organization of key conference of Dynamic Systems and Control Division of ASME. He is a Fellow of ASME and Associate Fellow of AIAA.

Gap-Yong Kim published three journal papers and two conference papers. Dr. Kim also reviewed 19 journal and conference articles. He also served on various boards and committees including as Chair of the Technical Committee for Textile & Composite Engineering of Manufacturing Engineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

Song-Charng Kong conducts innovative research in multiphase flows and renewable energy systems. His group has developed high-fidelity computational framework for simulating biomass thermochemical conversion for biofuel production. He has developed highly-efficient optimization algorithms for diesel engine performance optimization. He is an associate editor for ASME Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbine and Power, associate editor for Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering, and a member in the editorial board of Internal Journal of Engine Research. He is currently the Program Director of the Combustion and Fire Systems Program (ENG/CBET) at the National Science Foundation.

Part of Adarsh Krishnamurthy’s research in 2015 focused on computational modeling of heart failure, where identifying patients who will best respond to a particular therapeutic intervention is difficult. Computational models, developed from patient-specific clinical data, can help refine the diagnosis and personalize heart failure intervention therapies. His research has recently been used to ascertain a possible mechanism for improvement due to cardiac resynchronization therapy, which uses implantable pacemakers to synchronize ventricular function, for the first time. This preliminary investigation suggests the possibility of extracting important diagnostic information from clinical measurements using computational models.

Valery Levitas developed new phase field approaches for dislocations and interaction of phase transformation and dislocation evolution; solid-solid transformations via nanoscale intermediate interfacial phase through critical nucleus with revealing new mechanics effects; nanoscale melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by picosecond laser; multiphase temperature- and stress-induced phase transformations, and phase transformations with anisotropic interface energies and stresses. His research also found new results on improving reactivity of Al micron scale particles by pre-stressing.

Barbara Lograsso collaborated with several faculty members and graduate students for the creation of a prototype trial project component on 3D scanning for the Reverse Engineering Project in ME170. He also collaborated as a Co-PI with A. Bastawros of Aerospace Engineering, W. Meeker, and R. Maitra of Statistics along with Indiana State Police Forensic Scientist, J. Vanderkolk to propose a study selected for a two-year award by National Institutes of Justice.

Meng Lu authored or co-authored 12 journal articles and seven conference papers. He was also granted new reserach funding from 3M Company and continued to work on a research project funded by ISU’s Leopold Center for Sustianable Agriculture.

Greg Luecke was instrumental in developing and commercializing new technology related to visualization and controls. Supported Iowa-based companies, Deere and Co. and Winegard Company, and Vermeer Corp. with research projects on new technology development. Based on research with ISU, Deere and Co is now selling the S-Series GoHarvest™Premium Combine Simulator. Using development work from ISU, Winegard has multiple tracking antenna products available for consumer purchase, including the Pathway X1.

Margret Mathison assisted in the implementation of a flipped classroom for ME 270 and learn about the methods that Greg Maxwell has found effective for ME 441. She continued her involvement in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) at the national level by serving as a speaker at the society’s winter conference, chairing a standard development committee, and serving as a vice-chair for a technical committee. At the local level, she has established connections to the Iowa ASHRAE Chapter leadership.

Greg Maxwell continued to lead the Industrial Assessment Cetner and also worked with the Iowa Energy Center on one existing project and proposed an additional project. Dr. Maxwell also served as co-chair for the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety and continued to lead the Nuclear Engineering Minor program at ISU.

Mark Mba Wright and his research team was recognized by Black & Veatch for thier efforts with a “Building a World of Difference” Faculty Fellowship. He also started the U.S. Agency for International Development project in Uganda and published eight journal publications.

Scott Merkle taught ME Capstone Senior Design (ME415 and ME466) involving 112 students, 24 project teams, and 12 sponsors ranging from global corporations to newly formed LLCs and to other departments within ISU. He also taught Machine Design (ME325) involving 174 students, and mentored an independent study student in a research and design application of RFID technology for positioning and navigation. He also assisted hosting the Caterpillar Corporation Saturday Design Challenge where seven student club teams competed for a total prize purse of $5,000.

James Michael along with ME assistant professor Travis Sippel received a DURIP award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to develop instrumentation for the study of multiphase combustion enhancement through pulsed microwave plasma interactions.

Reza Montazami and his research team published five journal articles. He also presented his research at the MRS spring meeting, received Big 12 Faculty Fellowship, and established external academic and industry collaborations. His research was highlighted in the news for the second consecutive year and he taught two new courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

James Oliver leads ISU’s Virtual Reality Applications Center and its graduate program in Human Computer Interaction. His research, teaching, and economic development activities focus on human computer interaction technologies, encompassing computer graphics, geometric modeling, virtual reality, and collaborative networks for applications in product development and complex system operation. His research is supported by a variety of industry partners and federal agencies, and the VRAC supports a broad interdisciplinary constituency that spans the entire university.

Michael Olsen published five papers in archival journals. He was also invited to give the keynote lecture to the 2016 International Symposium of Flow Visualization, which took place during the summer of 2016.

Sonal Padalkar has one research publication under review and two manuscripts under preparation. She also taught ME 231 for three semesters and recruited and retained female researchers in her lab.

Alberto Passalacqua published the first release of OpenQBMM, the first open-source implementation of quadrature-based moment methods to solve population balance equations for nucleation, aggregation, breakup, growth of nanoparticles.

Paola Pittoni taught five different courses taught, for a total of 314 students and ten sections, with a mean overall teaching effectiveness of 4.53. She also led an ISU power plant visit included as a curriculum activity for ME 231 and served as first author on a paper enetitled “Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science.”

Rafael Radkowski investigated a maximum likelihood (ML) solution for the iterative closest point method incorporating a mixture of Gaussians to distinguish multiple rigid objects in a 3D point cloud data set. The outcome poses a milestone in his tracking research: the ML estimation increases the robustness of the entire tracking approach to a point that practical applications under real-world conditions are possible. Thus, the tracking method will allow application developers to use marker-less object tracking in AR applications. Other researchers, from the field of Human Computer Interaction for instance, can rely on a robust tracking solution for their own research.

Juan Ren set-up the Nano-/bio-mechanical study and control research lab, and recruited PhD students for research projects focusing on biological and nanoscale sciences. She also helped to develop the teaching lab for ME410.

Soumik Sarkar and his research group have developed hierarchical spatiotemporal feature extraction algorithms with an emphasis on Deep Learning tools for complex system modeling, understanding scientific patterns from data and design with significant success on various application areas including combustion processes, microfluidic channels, building and wind turbine systems and plant disease detection. They have also developed Generalized Gossip based policies for distributed optimization with an application focus on agent-based supervisory control of building HVAC systems for energy efficiency. The reseach was supported by NSF, Rockwell Collins and Iowa Energy Center.

In 2015, Cris Schwartz spent a significant amount of my time identifying and addressing capacity limitations in our curriculum and how those could be addressed in order to serve our growing enrollment while maintaining program quality. Last yera he worked with the Curriculum Development Committees to identify space and equipment needs that were most vital to this mission. As a result, the department was able to invest substantially in some of our upper-level teaching labs which will not only help to address our rising enrollments, but also improve the student experience in ME’s curriculum.

Howard Shapiro’s most notable contribution to the department is to provide leadership and impetus for faculty development in teaching and learning. ME LEARNS! is bringing together new faculty and established faculty to learning and grow together and is stimulating curriculum discussion and enhancing interdepartmental communication about teaching and curriculum.
He was also appointed chair of the Edward F. Obert Award Committee, in which he will oversee the annual selection of the society-wide award for best paper in Thermodynamics.

Pranav Shrotriya received three new research grants , presented invited seminars at Oklahoma State University and Lund University, Sweden. He served as the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research till Fall 2015 and worked with department faculty to: increase graduate enrollment to 256 students making ME the fourth largest graduate and PhD program in the university.

In 2015, Travis Sippel’s research group achieved advancements to our detonation-speed heating apparatus, enabling reproduction of the thermal loads within energetic applications from combustion to detonation within a small, benchtop device. We demonstrated this year the world’s first microwave-seeded plasma throttleable solid rocket propellant using a novel propellant doping technique combined with microwave-flame application (collaboration with JB Michael). The technique can enable the active control of the burning rate of solid propellant and has potential to improve combustion in other propulsion systems.

Nine students, Mark Mba-Wright, and Gloria Starns traveled to San Isidro, Nicaragua to design and fabricate sustainable systems as an outcome of M E 402x, Human Centered Design; the experience of co-designing products with the Nicaraguan community was transformative for everyone involved in the class.

Shankar Subramaniam was awarded the College of Engineering’s Accelerating Collaborative Research Initiative (ACRI) grant for developing a strategic research thrust in multiphase flows through the Center for Multiphase Flow Research. He delivered invited seminars at Chemeca 2014 in Perth, Australia, and at the Enabling Process Innovation through Computation (EPIC) Seminar Series in LSU. He delivered the Lindbergh Lecture at University of Wisconsin, Madison, and also participated in the Stanford Center for Turbulence Research’s 2014 Summer Program.

Sriram Sundararajan is the College of Engineering Equity Advisor. Through this role, he works with college leadership to enhance the diversity of the faculty body. He assumed leadership of the Broader Impacts Platform of the Iowa NSF EPSCoR project and helps build research infrastructure across the state.

Judy Vance co-edited a book entitled “Advances in Computers and Information in Engineering Research” published by ASME Press. This is the first volume in a series covering current research in Advanced Modeling and Simulation; Computer-Aided Product and Process Development; Systems Engineering, Information and Knowledge Management; and Virtual Environments and Systems.

Xinwei Wang has 15 papers published or accepted for publication in highly visible journals, and one book chapter accepted for publication. He received the Iowa State University Award for Mid-Career Achievement in Research, and was elected to Fellow Grade of ASME. In 2014, he has been advising 10 Ph.D. students, two M.S. students, and one visiting scholar to do research in his lab on various frontier thermal transport areas.

Research in Eliot Winer’s lab continued on using Augmented Reality in manufacturing during training and daily work. Dr. Winer also researched the fusion of sensor and self-reported data during human subject testing in a manufacturing task. Lastly, researchers in Dr. Winer’s group studied the effects of stereopsis on spatial tasks in a medical context. Results showed that for medical training, diagnosis and treatment, the effect is significant.

2014-15

Abhijit Chandra’s work on multi-physics simulation of chemical mechanical planarization continues to be used by several industries. Based on his group’s research, hip implant life expectancies are enhanced by Aeculap AG of Germany. Work on enhancing life expectancy of wind turbine gear boxes was initiated in collaboration with Nanjing Tech. University and Nanjing Gongda CNC Machine Tools Co. of China.

Jonathan Claussen has established research collaborations with faculty from Texas A&M University, University of Florida, Brigham Young University, as well as Iowa State University and has acted as a committee member and session chair for SPIE Defense, Security, & Sensing Conference in Baltimore, MD. Jonathan has laid the groundwork to use and develop interactive, online teaching programs for ISU undergraduate students in ME 160 and for high school students in the Young Engineers and Scientist (YES) Program who perform research at ISU. He has also initiated outreach activities with the Des Moines Hoover High School where he will visit with students and encourage students, in particular underrepresented minorities, to pursue college education and careers in the STEM fields.

Sebastien Feve wrote the winning proposal for Hybrid Instruction of ME170, ME270, ME415, ME466 from the CELT Online Innovation Hub in collaboration with Jackie Baughman, Gloria Starns, Matt Hagge and Josh Mineroff. He also organized and led a presentation & panel discussion event for 300+ ME freshman students to “Internationalize the Freshmen Experience in ME170”. Guest speakers and participants were from the College of Engineering, the World Languages/LCP program, the COE International Office and John Deere.

Baskar Ganapathysubramanian was selected as PSI faculty Fellow, was selected as a US NAS run Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering and Medicine attendee, and his research work was highlighted as cover page on ‘Lab-on-a-chip’.

Matt Hagge established a new pedagogy called Decision Based Learning. He produced a tutor that provides very rapid rates of improvement in student understanding. Matt is working to actively publish this pedagogy and its potential for learning, improved instruction, and outcome (ABET, state, etc) evaluation.

Nicole N Hashemi delivered two keynote presentations both nationally and internationally. Her collaborative work was highlighted by many news agencies such as Fox News, Phys.org and Science News.

Ted Heindel published his first book in 2014, entitled “An Introduction to Bioreactor Hydrodynamics and Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer.” He also leads the Iowa NSF EPSCoR project and led a successful reverse site visit to NSF where the entire project was positively reviewed by a 13-member panel. Ted is also the Director of Graduate Education for the Masters of Engineering Degree in Energy Systems Engineering, which is a new program that was approved by the Board of Regents in 2014.

Jim Heise was promoted to Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering. Jim continues serving the department as Design Projects Coordinator. 43 projects were selected for the ME Capstone Senior Design Program spread over 71 teams; 27 of these projects were in direct support of Iowa manufacturers and cosponsored by CIRAS. Economic impact of these projects is being tracked by CIRAS and is estimated to be potentially in the millions of dollars. Jim continues to serve as faculty advisor to the ISU Lunabotics Club who had another remarkable year winning the autonomy award at the 5th Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center.

Ming-Chen Hsu has been developing novel computational methods for fluids, structures and fluid-structure interaction applied to contemporary engineering problems such as wind turbine and heart valve analysis. He has published six journal papers and two book chapters. His articles received 783 citations based on Google Scholar in 2014.

Shan Hu is establishing a laboratory for experimental research on nanomaterials for energy storage and energy harvesting. Lab capabilities being established include materials synthesis, device fabrication, and performance characterization.

Atul Kelkar was awarded a US Patent in the area of conversion of hazardous waste hydrocarbons into usable fuels. He is contributing to K-12 STEM education by developing an innovative educational video games based on his years of experience in aerospace research. His contributions were featured in AIAA’s newsletter which is read worldwide. Dr. Kelkar published a NASA Paper jointly with NASA Senior Scientist on the control of asteroid capture spacecraft. His entrepreneurial efforts have not only led to positive economic impact and job creation for the state but have also benefited engineering faculty at Iowa State through research subcontracts through DoD STTR grants. He also held leadership position in organization of key conference of Dynamic Systems and Control Division of ASME. He is Fellow of ASME and Associate Fellow of AIAA.

Song-Charng Kong conducts innovative research in multiphase flows and renewable energy systems. His group has developed high-fidelity computational framework for simulating biomass thermochemical conversion for biofuel production. He has developed highly-efficient optimization algorithms for diesel engine performance optimization. He also collaborates with Army Research Laboratory on investigating the fundamentals of diesel spray atomization, mixing, and fuel drop interactions with pistons for military applications. He is an associate editor for ASME Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbine and Power, associate editor for Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering, and a member in the editorial board of Internal Journal of Engine Research.

Part of Adarsh Krishnamurthy’s research in 2014 focused on computational modeling of heart failure, where identifying patients who will best respond to a particular therapeutic intervention is difficult. Computational models, developed from patient-specific clinical data, can help refine the diagnosis and personalize heart failure intervention therapies. His group’s research has recently been used to ascertain a possible mechanism for improvement due to cardiac resynchronization therapy, which uses implantable pacemakers to synchronize ventricular function, for the first time. This preliminary investigation suggests the possibility of extracting important diagnostic information from clinical measurements using computational models.

Greg Luecke continues significant research with industry partners Deere and Co. and Wingard Company in the areas of dynamic simulation, controls, computer interfacing and virtual reality.

Mark Mba-Wright’s research group won first place in the Sustainable Biorefineries poster session at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers conference. They were awarded a Borlaug Fellowship to support food security in Ghana from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and they published 4 journal papers.

Reza Montazami initiated and directed a strong research program on Advanced Transient Materials, which attracted significant attention from media. Preliminary results are published in Advanced Functional Materials (IF 10.44). He has aggressively worked toward improving diversity in the department.

James Oliver leads ISU’s Virtual Reality Applications Center and its graduate program in Human Computer Interaction. His research, teaching, and economic development activities focus on human computer interaction technologies, encompassing computer graphics, geometric modeling, virtual reality, and collaborative networks for applications in product development and complex system operation. His research is supported by a variety of industry partners and federal agencies, and the VRAC supports a broad interdisciplinary constituency that spans the entire university.

Sonal Padalkar published a paper: S. Padalkar, J. R. Riley, Q. Li, G. T. Wang, L. J. Lauhon, “Lift-out procedures for atom probe tomography targeting nanoscale features in core-shell nanowire heterostructures” Physica Status Solidi (c). 11, 656 (2014). She is also working on a manuscript from her post-doc work and taught ME 231, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics – I.

Alberto Passalacqua received $499,999 from the NSF-ACI SI2 for the development of OpenQBMM, an open-source tool to simulate polydisperse multiphase flows using quadrature-based moment methods. He developed a novel computational model to simulate aggregation and breakup in chemically reacting systems, suitable to investigate the nanoparticle formation in chemical reactors.

Rafael Radkowski reached a milestone in his natural visual perception research by successfully simulating visual depth cues to enhance the spatial understanding of scenes in augmented reality (AR) applications. This will facilitate a better understanding of, for instance, distances and sizes in virtual design reviews. He also introduced an object tracking method for AR that focuses on engineering products and is able to cope with different object sizes and object details.

Soumik Sarkar and his research group have developed hierarchical feature extraction algorithms with an emphasis on Deep Learning tools for complex system modeling and design and demonstrated initial success on microfluidic channels, wind turbine systems and simulated chaotic dynamical systems. Rockwell Collins will be sponsoring a project in 2015 to move this research forward for image and video denoising applications. They have developed Generalized Gossip based policies for distributed optimization and control of multi-agent systems with an application focus on agent-based supervisory control of building HVAC systems for energy efficiency and Iowa Energy Center has awarded a grant for feasibility demonstration in 2015.

Cris Schwartz completed a long-term analysis of student success in the ME major and developed the ME Foundations concept to address the challenges to the Undergraduate Program stemming from underprepared students and rapidly growing enrollment. The effort to determine an optimal group of courses for the Foundations, and to project the long-term impacts, used a data-driven approach that involved multiple ME and non-ME personnel. This approach is the first of its kind in the College of Engineering, and so its implementation may serve as a model for the future of the College in light of its stated mission to deliver a high-quality educational experience.

Howard Shapiro’s most notable achievement in 2014 was the successful completion of the 8th edition of Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Hoboken, with M. J. Moran, D. D. Boetner, and M. B. Bailey. This book continues to set the standard for engineering thermodynamics education worldwide.

Pranav Shrotriya received a new research grant and presented a keynote presentation at the Society of Engineering Science Annual Technical Meeting. He served as the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research and worked with department faculty to increase graduate enrollment to 225 students, making ME the fourth largest graduate and PhD program in the university.

Two of Travis Sippel’s journal articles were accepted or appeared in publication; two additional articles were submitted, and two conference papers were presented at the AIChE Fall Meeting. Research funding was obtained from Sandia National Laboratory to develop high speed joule heating instrumentation for shock wave instrumentation and the study of energetic material ignition at ultrafast heating rates.

Nine students, Mark Mba-Wright, and Gloria Starns traveled to San Isidro, Nicaragua to design and fabricate sustainable systems as an outcome of M E 402x, Human Centered Design; the experience of co-designing products with the Nicaraguan community was transformative for everyone involved in the class.

Shankar Subramaniam was awarded the College of Engineering’s Accelerating Collaborative Research Initiative (ACRI) grant for developing a strategic research thrust in multiphase flows through the Center for Multiphase Flow Research. He delivered invited seminars at Chemeca 2014 in Perth, Australia, and at the Enabling Process Innovation through Computation (EPIC) Seminar Series in LSU. He delivered the Lindbergh Lecture at University of Wisconsin, Madison, and also participated in the Stanford Center for Turbulence Research’s 2014 Summer Program.

Sriram Sundararajan is the College of Engineering Equity Advisor. Through this role, he works with college leadership to enhance the diversity of the faculty body. He assumed leadership of the Broader Impacts Platform of the Iowa NSF EPSCoR project and helps build research infrastructure across the state.
Judy Vance co-edited a book entitled “Advances in Computers and Information in Engineering Research” published by ASME Press. This is the first volume in a series covering current research in Advanced Modeling and Simulation; Computer-Aided Product and Process Development; Systems Engineering, Information and Knowledge Management; and Virtual Environments and Systems.

Xinwei Wang had 15 papers published or accepted for publication in highly visible journals, and one book chapter accepted for publication. He received the Iowa State University Award for Mid-Career Achievement in Research, and was elected to Fellow Grade of ASME. In 2014, he has been advising 10 Ph.D. students, two M.S. students, and one visiting scholar to do research in his lab on various frontier thermal transport areas.

Research in Eliot Winer’s lab continued on using Augmented Reality in manufacturing during training and daily work. Dr. Winer also researched the fusion of sensor and self-reported data during human subject testing in a manufacturing task. Lastly, researchers in Dr. Winer’s group studied the effects of stereopsis on spatial tasks in a medical context. Results showed that for medical training, diagnosis and treatment, the effect is significant.

2013-14

Jessica Van Winkle Recognized as an Exemplary Peer Mentor Supervisor

Jessica Van Winkle, academic adviser in mechanical engineering, was chosen as an exemplary peer mentor supervisor for the 2013-2014 academic term. As learning community supervisor for the largest department on campus, Van Winkle is responsible for peer mentors across 10 different learning communities. One of Van Winkle’s nominators was Ryan Jennings, senior in mechanical engineering. “Jessica does an exceptional job of allowing peer mentors to plan and lead their learning communities independently while still having a level of standardization and decorum. This has allowed me to become a better leader by learning on the job the best way to lead the different groups of students I have had,” Jennings said.

Brown and Team Awarded Patent Key to BEI Research

A team headed by Robert Brown, BEI director, has been awarded a patent for bio-oil fractionation. “We have built much of our research around this technology,” Brown said. The patent, number US 8,476,480, was awarded in July 2013 to Brown; Samuel Jones, a former scientist with BEI’s Center for Sustainable Environmental Research; and Anthony Pollard, a former graduate student of Brown’s. The invention was developed with funding from the U.S. Dept. of Energy and the USDA. Full Story

Sundararajan Named College of Engineering Equity Advisor

On Nov. 1, 2013 Sriram Sundararajan began serving as the next College of Engineering equity advisor. In this role, he will help expand the diversity among the college’s faculty and implement ISU ADVANCE goals. He will also lead continued efforts to create an inclusive culture for women and underrepresented minorities within the college. Sundararajan says he is looking forward to learning about best practices on enhancing diversity and faculty mentoring across the university and beyond, and helping adapt these practices for the college. Full Story

ME Faculty Receive Presidential Initiative for Interdisciplinary Research Awards

Daniel Attinger, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and Reza Montazami, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, both received awards from the Presidential Initiative for Interdisciplinary Research program created by President Steven Leath. Attinger received a proof-of-concept award of up to $100,000 for one year. He is the principal investigator of a project titled “Computationally Engineered Plant Institute.” The project focused on the future of food security entails collaboration between engineers and plant scientists. Montazami is part of a project called “Integrated, Interdisciplinary Vaccine Research Against Antigenically Diverse Viruses” that received a pursuit funding award for up to $1.5 million over three years. The purpose of the project, which is led by principal investigator Michael Cho from biomedical sciences, is to develop novel strategies with a long-term goal of producing efficacious and cost-effective vaccines against viruses such as HIV-1 and influenza virus. Full Story

CoE Faculty Members Receive Presidential Initiative Awards

Balaji Narasimhan, associate dean for research, and Daniel Attinger, associate professor of mechanical engineering, both received awards from the Presidential Initiative for Interdisciplinary Research program created by President Steven Leath. Narasimhan is the principal investigator of a project called “Systems Design of Nanovaccines,” which is seeking to revolutionize disease prevention and treatment using nanovaccines. His project was granted a funding award of up to $4.5 million over three years to pursue competitive grants for further research. Attinger received a proof-of-concept award of up to $100,000 for one year, which is for projects that are more limited in scope. He is the principal investigator of a project titled “Computationally Engineered Plant Institute.” The project focused on the future of food security entails collaboration between engineers and plant scientists. Full Story

Caroline Hayes Named ASME Fellow

Caroline Hayes, chair of the mechanical engineering department and Lynn Gleason Professor of Interdisciplinary Engineering, recently became an ASME Fellow. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers recognizes members who have had 10 or more years of practice in the field and an active membership with ASME. Throughout her time as a member, Hayes has been involved in a variety of ASME committees, doing everything from gathering and preparing technical papers to organizing conferences. The amount of work she puts into each position varies from year to year. She says she enjoys attending the annual conferences, spending time with friends she has met throughout her career, and gathering with fellow female engineers from around the world. ASME Fellows are nominated by their peers for outstanding achievements in engineering. Hayes says her nomination came as “a pleasant surprise.” Full Story

Xinwei Wang Named First Viskanta Fellow for Innovative Research

Xinwei Wang, professor of mechanical engineering, received the inaugural Viskanta Fellowship honor from Purdue University for his advanced research in the field of thermal science. As a Viskanta Fellow, Wang will spend one week at the Purdue campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. During his visit, he will meet with faculty, post-doctoral scholars, and graduate students, as well as present a one-hour lecture. Full Story

Biofuels Digest Honors Brown Twice in 2012

For the third consecutive year, Anson Marston Distinguished Professor in Engineering Robert Brown was ranked in the Top 100 People in Bioenergy by Biofuels Digest. In 2013 he rose to #47, after his rankings at #59 and #61, in 2012 and 2011, respectively. The list is voted on by Biofuels Digest readers and the newsletter’s editorial board. Brown is the Gary and Donna Hoover Chair in Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Professor of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Director of the Bioeconomy Institute, and Director of the Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies. Full Story

Ted Heindel Named ASME Fellow

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers has named ME Interim Department Chair Ted Heindel as a 2011 Fellow. The ASME Board of Governors bestows the fellowship grade to worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Ted is receiving this honor for “his accomplishments in advancing the field of complex multiphase flow systems, particularly with respect to novel x-ray imaging methods and applications to biorenewable technologies, and in serving the profession in leadership roles.” Full Story

Abhijit Chandra Receives D. R. Boylan Eminent Faculty Research Award

The Boylan Award recognizes engineering faculty of national and international acclaim for their dedication to academic excellence through research and exemplary contributions to understanding in their field of specialization. Abhijit is recognized for his research activity and scholarship in the area of the mechanics of manufacturing processes. He is a professor in the ME department.

Amy Carver Receives Dean’s Staff Excellence Award

Amy received the College of Engineering Dean’s Staff Excellence Award for her outstanding work as graduate programs assistant in the ME Department. ME Director of Graduate Education Pranav Shrotriya said, “Amy Carver has demonstrated an extremely high level of enthusiasm, professional responsibility and ambassadorship for the Mechanical Engineering Department and the College of Engineering. Over the past 3 years, she has been instrumental in: developing new recruitment initiatives; deployment of professional master’s degree and enhancing the graduate student experience through development of orientation programs, social activities, and improved systematic communications.”

Scott Bowman Receives Professional Achievement Citation in Engineering Award

This award recognizes the outstanding achievement by an alumnus of the College in the professional practice of engineering. Scott is known in the profession for his creativity at KJWW Engineering Consultants, where he has risen through the firm to be one of eight principals, as well as for his commitment to the engineering profession through sustainability efforts and supporting women in engineering. Scott is a member of the ME Industry Advisory Council, and he received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from ISU in 1982.

Jessica Van Winkle Elected to Professional & Scientific Council

Jessica Van Winkle, ME academic advisor, was elected to the ISU Professional & Scientific Council as an Academic & Research representative. The P&S Council is a representative body elected by, and responsible to, Professional & Scientific employees at Iowa State. The council studies issues affecting the P&S employee base, presents proposals to the ISU Administration, arranges open forums, and coordinates the P&S awards. The ME department will be well represented by Jessica.

25 Year Club Honorees

The 25 Year Club honors the loyal service of ISU faculty and staff. Greg Maxwell, associate professor, and Jim Dautremont, lab mechanical technologist, became members in 2011 after serving the university for 25 years.

2012-13

Emmanuel Agba is the major adviser to the PrISUm Solar Car Team.  The team raced to 4th position in the 2011 Formula Sun Grand Prix solar car racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Daniel Attinger was the lead organizer and Chair of the 2011 IMECE Micro & Nano Technology Society-Wide Forum. More than 200 posters were presented, mainly by graduate students, at this event sponsored by the National Science Foundation and by the Materials Division and Nanoengineering Council of ASME. The 22 judges for the poster session were mainly faculty members from research Universities. The top three leaders of ASME (President, President-elect, and Executive Director) attended the award ceremony ($40K of awards) that ended that event.
Attinger received a certificate of Appreciation from Vicky Rockwell, ASME president, who promised more support for 2012.

Robert Brown leads Iowa State’s Bioeconomy Institute (BEI), which promotes interdisciplinary research in biofuels and biobased products. In the past year, the BEI received over $50 million in new award for research in the field of biorenewables.

Mark Bryden coauthored with Ken Ragland, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the textbook Combustion Engineering. Combustion is a critical issue impacting energy utilization, sustainability, and climate change. The challenge is to design safe and efficient combustion systems for many types of fuels in a way that protects the environment and enables sustainable lifestyles. Emphasizing the use of combustion fundamentals in the engineering and design of combustion systems, this textbook provides detailed coverage of gaseous, liquid and solid fuel combustion, including focused coverage of biomass combustion.

Abhijit Chandra received the David R. Boylan Eminent Faculty Award for Research from the College of Engineering. His work on life prediction of orthopedic implants is being used by Aeculap AG of Germany.

Sebastien Feve developed and/or co-developed several team-based projects in ME170 exposing freshman students to reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and computer-aided manufacturing through hands-on, open-ended design projects.

Baskar Ganapathysubramanian achieved extension and preliminary validation of first fully predictive framework for the three dimensional morphology of a thin film organic photovoltaic device, and developed a fault tolerant, adaptive sparse grid collocation framework for solving high-dimensional complex stochastic problems. He developed a framework for analyzing effects of ductwork on efficiency of green buildings.

Matt Hagge wrote a journal article based on work after completion of PhD, completion of ME 231 course based on student understanding, FE Exam Review.

Nicole N Hashemi published three articles in high impact journals of Biomicrofluidics, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, and Analytical Chemistry. She gave more than seven invited presentations and talks and presented her work in Gordon Research Conferences – Microfluidics, Physics & Chemistry. Her research was selected for publication in the Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology and was listed in the Top 20 Most Read Articles Published in Biomicrofluidics in October and November.

Ted Heindel was elected Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and received a courtesy appointment in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. He is also leading the effort to develop an undergraduate minor and coursework-only masters of engineering in energy systems.

In 2011, Jim Heise introduced 29 projects into the ME Capstone Design Program for senior design courses ME415 and 466. Of those projects, thirteen were co-sponsored by ISU Extension CIRAS in support of Iowa manufacturers; two were for out-of-state corporations; 12 projects were associated with student club design competitions; one project was for an extended care facility in northern Iowa; and two were for M E department faculty projects. Jim’s summer efforts were to assist Dr. Ron Cox and the College of Engineering to adopt practices used by the M E Department to help other department efficiently manage company-sponsored capstone design projects. Jim also accompanied ISU’s Lunabotics Club to the 2nd annual NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center; the team made a good showing but did not place.

Dr. Kelkar is working with Ames, Iowa startup on the development of new processes and equipment which can be used to recover energy from waste streams such as waste plastics, used oil, and used tires in the form of useful fuels. Dr. Kelkar is also a member of a NASA team engaged in developing methods and tools for early-stage control-relevant design of next generation of Hypersonic vehicles. His impact through entrepreneurial efforts is engagement of ISU faculty from other engineering departments in new research projects through DoD STTR grant. For his contribution to the aerospace field he has been selected to the grade of Associate Fellow of AIAA.

Song-Charng Kong conducts innovative research in exploring alternative engine fuels such as ammonia, mixtures of biodiesel and waste plastics, and mixtures of bio-oil and ethanol. His research also includes biomass gasification and bioenergy systems analysis. He was appointed an associate editor for ASME Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbine and Power and also a member in the editorial board of Internal Journal of Engine Research in recognition of his excellence in engine research.

Dr. MacDonald’s research team continues to grow, adding two new graduate and two undergraduate students. She is very grateful for the entire department’s support regarding the addition of the youngest new member of the lab, her first child, this past winter. The IRIS lab wishes good luck to postdoc Tahira Reid, as she recently left the lab to join the faculty at Purdue University. Dr. MacDonald presented research findings that indicate it is beneficial to include prediction of landowner participation rates in wind farm layout optimizations at the annual ASME Design Automation Conference, the University of Iowa, and at a meeting of the new Wind Energy Institute at Iowa State University. Her lab also created a new design method to better communicate the sustainability of products; and discovered a relationship between variability in visual perception of products and variability in preference for these products. She advised two NSF REU students this summer and was nominated for the Design Automation Committee’s Young Investigator Award (an ASME committee).

Greg Maxwell received renewed support for the Industrial Assessment Center (5 years at $1,000,000), and continued the expansion of the nuclear engineering minor program.

Dr. Terry Meyer received a 5-year National Science Foundation CAREER award for his work on laser diagnostics for combustion and alternative fuels. He also continued as a guest professor at Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany, visiting for a month in the Summer of 2011. He served as chair of two conferences for the Optical Society of America, in addition to co-editing a special issue of Applied Optics.

Pal Molian’s research supervision of a female undergraduate student (Roslyn Melokooran) in 2011 led to an archival journal paper: Roslyn Melookaran, Ammar Melaibari, Cheng Deng and Pal Molian, “Laser shock processing on microstructure and hardness of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tools with and without nanodiamond powders,” Materials and Design, 35 (2012) 235-242. Two of Dr. Molian’s research papers were among “Top 20 Most Read” according to the Journal of Laser Applications. Source: http://jla.aip.org/most_downloaded?month=6&year=2011.

Reza Montazami set up two experimental laboratories: the Smart Materials Laboratory for conducting research on polymeric thin-films, and the Renewable Energy Concepts Laboratory to conduct research on electro-fuels and fuel cells.

In 2011, Dr. Morrow received an NSF EAGER award for “Large-Scale Equilibrium Design and Pricing under Complex Government Regulations,” research that will significantly advance the state-of-the-art in engineering-economic modeling. Dr. Morrow also continued to co-organize the ME Design Expo, an event that gives ISU ME students an opportunity to demonstrate their accomplishments in our many project-based design courses to each other and the public.

Professor Oliver leads ISU’s Virtual Reality Applications Center and its graduate program in Human Computer Interaction. His research, teaching, and economic development activities focus on human computer interaction technologies, encompassing computer graphics, geometric modeling, virtual reality, and collaborative networks for applications in product development and complex system operation. His research is supported by a variety of industry partners and federal agencies, and the VRAC supports a broad interdisciplinary constituency that spans the entire university.

Mike Olsen published a paper with Baskar Ganapathysubramaniam and graduate student Anthony Fontanini in Energy and Buildings on fabric ducting in HVAC applications that was highlighted in the The HVAC&R Industry eNewsletter from ASHRAE and other trade journals and publications.

Dr. Shrotriya served as the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research and worked with department faculty to develop new graduate certificate programs, establish learning community to improve retention of PhD students, recruit highly talented graduate students through targeted pipelines with regional schools and minority serving institutions, develop international exchange and graduate student recruitment programs, implement new professional degree program and improve the diversity of graduate student population.

Shankar Subramaniam received a National Science Foundation award to study the stability limits for gas-­solid suspensions using particle-­resolved direct numerical simulations. He has also obtained federal funding from the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory for collaborative research with a minority institution (Florida International University) to develop a two-­fluid drag law for clustered particles using direct numerical simulation. His research develops better multiphase models for computer simulation of CO2 cleanup, and carbon-­neutral energy generation technologies such as chemical looping combustion. Subramaniam presented an invited lecture on ‘Multiphase Flow Modeling and Simulation’ at the Indo-­US Science & Technology Forum’s Frontiers of Liquid Atomization Workshop held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India in Dec 2011. He organized a symposium on Multiphase Flow at the Society for Engineering Science’s 2011 Annual Meeting at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. He revamped the computational fluid dynamics laboratory exercise in undergraduate fluid mechanics ME 335 Fluid Flow in Fall 2011 as part of an effort to give students an exposure to modern tools in engineering, and he taught the graduate multiphase flow class ME 632 Multiphase Flow in Spring 2011.

Professor Sundararajan, in his role as Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies, has overseen the implementation of a sustainable assessment model to support the department’s continuous improvement and accreditation efforts. Under his leadership, the Undergraduate Education Committee has made several improvements to the ME curriculum, including expanding the communications requirements and ensuring exposure of freshman to ME content in their first engineering class.

Dr. Vance established a new laboratory: the Multimodal Experience Testbed and Laboratory (METaL). This laboratory consists of large scale stereo projection walls, position trackers, and 3D input devices. It is being used to develop natural interaction techniques to aid in product design.

Dr. Shrotriya served as the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research and worked with department faculty to develop new graduate certificate programs, establish learning community to improve retention of PhD students, recruit highly talented graduate students through targeted pipelines with regional schools and minority serving institutions, develop international exchange and graduate student recruitment programs, implement new professional degree program and improve the diversity of graduate student population.

Gloria Starns is working with linguists, psychologists, physicists and engineers to better understand how students go through the process of setting up and solving problems; the ultimate objective of this work is to develop systems that will help students successfully frame complex problems.

Shankar Subramaniam received a National Science Foundation award to study the stability limits for gas-­solid suspensions using particle-­resolved direct numerical simulations. He has also obtained federal funding from the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory for collaborative research with a minority institution (Florida International University) to develop a two-­fluid drag law for clustered particles using direct numerical simulation. His research develops better multiphase models for computer simulation of CO2 cleanup, and carbon-­neutral energy generation technologies such as chemical looping combustion. Subramaniam presented an invited lecture on ‘Multiphase Flow Modeling and Simulation’ at the Indo-­US Science & Technology Forum’s Frontiers of Liquid Atomization Workshop held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India in Dec 2011. He organized a symposium on Multiphase Flow at the Society for Engineering Science’s 2011 Annual Meeting at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. He revamped the computational fluid dynamics laboratory exercise in undergraduate fluid mechanics ME 335 Fluid Flow in Fall 2011 as part of an effort to give students an exposure to modern tools in engineering, and he taught the graduate multiphase flow class ME 632 Multiphase Flow in Spring 2011.

Professor Sundararajan, in his role as Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies, has overseen the implementation of a sustainable assessment model to support the department’s continuous improvement and accreditation efforts. Under his leadership, the Undergraduate Education Committee has made several improvements to the ME curriculum, including expanding the communications requirements and ensuring exposure of freshman to ME content in their first engineering class.

Dr. Vance established a new laboratory: the Multimodal Experience Testbed and Laboratory (METaL). This laboratory consists of large scale stereo projection walls, position trackers, and 3D input devices. It is being used to develop natural interaction techniques to aid in product design. Xinwei Wang was awarded two new grants by Kansas City Plant to study the thermophysical properties of diamond coatings. Three Ph.D. students graduated and one of them was awarded the Research Excellence Award. In 2011, Dr. Wang’s lab has published 11 papers in highly visible journals like ACS Nano, Small, Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Physical Review B, and Carbon, and has one paper accepted for publication as an invited review in journal “Nano Reviews.” Dr. Wang has given 3 invited/keynote talks, and 5 conference presentations. He was elected Associate Fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and was awarded “Taishan” Foreign Scholar by Shandong Province, P. R. China. He has one book entitled “Experimental Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Transport” in print by Wiley.

Dr. Song Zhang was awarded NSF CAREER grant and one US patent in 2011, and had 12 journal papers and 3 book chapters published or accepted. One journal paper was featured on the cover, another one was highlighted by Optics InfoBase as the Image of the Week, and the third one was among the top 5 most cited papers in the past 5 years published by Journal of Optics and Lasers in Engineering. His students won a number of awards including the NSF graduate research fellowship, the research excellence award, and the HCI student of the year award.

2010

Emmanuel Agba provided notable leadership in design and manufacturing course improvements and delivery. He led effort in upgrading manufacturing laboratory equipment for both teaching and research.

Robert Brown was named one the “Top 100 People in Bioenergy” in 2010 by Biofuels Digest. He chaired the first Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels and Biobased Products this past fall, which attracted almost 300 biofuels researchers from around the world to ISU.

In 2010 Mark Bryden and his research team won an R&D 100 award for his work in developing the software package OSG – Bullet. This is the third R&D 100 award received by Professor Bryden and his research in the past five years. The goal of this research is to enable the creation of integrated computational environments that support interactive real-time engineering decision making and design.Referred to as the “Oscars of Invention” the R&D 100 awards recognize the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year.

Abhijit Chandra’s research focused on multi-physics modeling of Chemical Mechanical Planarization. It was also applied to biomedical research such as life prediction of orthopedic implants.

Baskar Ganapathysubramanian developed a mathematical framework for interrogating and designing photovoltaic devices and SETDiR (Scalable Extensible Toolkit for Dimensionality Reduction), a computational framework for non-linear dimensionality and model reduction, which is funded by aprestigious NSF grant.

Ted Heindel was a PI on a grant to create energy education initiatives for the college of engineering. He also mentored undergraduate student Tim Morgan who won the ASME Fluids Engineering Division 2010Young Engineering Paper Contest, beating out graduate students from Purdue and Virginia Tech.

The ME Capstone Design Program under the direction of Jim Heise arranged for 23 projects for senior design courses. Sponsorship 17 industrial projects were acquired for ME415 and ENGR466 students. Of those projects, 16 were co-sponsored by ISU Extension CIRAS and one was sponsored by a national corporation; the CIRAS sponsored projects provide service outreach to Iowa industry. 4 additional projects were sponsored by student club organizations allowing students to obtain class credit for design activities that typically go unaccounted on their academic records. An additional project was worked by a team of ME seniors as a service outreach project for an extended care patient in northeast Iowa. Two ME senior designs were submitted for patent disclosure by the sponsoring company.

Atul Kelkar is working with an Ames, Iowa startup company on the development of new processes
and equipment which can be used to recover energy from waste streams such as waste plastics, used oil, and used tires in the form of useful fuels. Dr. Kelkar is also a member of a NASA team engaged indeveloping methods and tools for early-stage control-relevant design of next generation of Hypersonicvehicles. His entrepreneurial efforts are engaging ISU faculty from other engineering departments in new research projects through STTR grant.

Gap-Yong Kim received a grant from National Science Foundation titled, “Novel Manufacturing of Bio-inspired Metal Matrix Composites by Semisolid Forming-Joining”. His research group will establish a novel metal composite manufacturing process that can create a hierarchical structure, bio-inspired by an abalone seashell.

Song-Charng Kong performed innovative research in exploring alternative engine fuels such as ammonia, mixtures of biodiesel and waste plastics, and mixtures of bio-oil and ethanol. His research also included the combustion of synthesis gas produced from biomass gasification. He was named William and Virginia Binger Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in recognition of his excellence in research and education.

Greg Luecke recently began research and development for mobile satellite TV antenna and two-wayInternet antenna that involves the use of a six-degree-of-freedom vehicle simulation motion base.

The Nuclear Engineering Minor continued to grow under the leadership of Greg Maxwell. This year had seen the development of two new nuclear engineering courses – NUC E 441 (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) taught by Dr. Heising (IMSE) and NUC E 461 (Radiation Detection, Measurement and Simulation) taught by Dr. Maxwell (ME). The nuclear engineering minor is attracting students from EE, AeroE, MatE, ChemE as well as ME.

Jim Oliver continued to lead ISU’s Virtual Reality Applications Center and its graduate program in Human Computer Interaction. His research, teaching, and economic development activities focus on human computer interaction technologies, encompassing computer graphics, geometric modeling, virtual reality, and collaborative networks for applications in product development and complex system operation. His research is supported by a variety of industry partners and federal agencies, and theVRAC supports a broad interdisciplinary constituency that spans the entire university.

Michael Olsen’s archival journal papers were cited 143 times in 2010 according to Web of Science.

Pranav Shrotriya served as Technical Program Chair for Bioengineering Materials, Mechanics and Structures and Student Symposia track at 47th Annual Technical Meeting of Society of Engineering Science at Ames, Iowa October 2010. In collaboration with Prof. Sundararajan, he has established a NSF REUsite on microscale sensing, imaging and actuation (MoSAIc) in the department. He is currently serving as theDirector of Graduate Education (DOGE) and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research.

Gloria Starns studied how linguists, psychologists, physicists and engineers are working together to better understand how students go through the process of setting up and solving problems; the ultimate objective of this work is to develop systems that will help students successfully complete complex problems.

Shankar Subramaniam conducted research at the University of Florida, Gainesville as part of his FPDA (sabbatical) to develop a new mathematical formulation for multiphase flows that relaxes the assumption of separation of scales by accounting for fluctuations in the number and associated volumefraction of particles. He delivered lectures on this topic at the National Energy Technology Laboratoryin Morgantown, WV to developers of the popular MFIX code for multiphase flow simulation. Results were presented at the 2010 International Conference on Multiphase Flow at Tampa, FL, and Professor Subramaniam’s paper was selected from 400 other papers for the Best Paper Award. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation award in collaboration with Professor M. G. Olsen (ME, ISU) to develop better multiphase models for CO2 cleanup through studying heat and mass Transfer in fluid-particle suspensions through direct numerical simulation and laser-based measurements.

Sriram Sundararajan, together with Prof. Shrotriya established an NSF-sponsored summer research program on Multiscale Sensing, Actuation and Imaging (MoSAIc) to engage undergraduate studentsfrom across the nation in the department’s research programs. Dr. Sundararajan, in working with the Undergraduate Education Committee, has developed a sustainable assessment model to support the department’s continuous improvement and accreditation efforts. He was appointed as Assistant Editor to the Wear Special Issue with articles from the 2011 International Conference on Wear of Materials.

Judy Vance has been appointed the Joseph C. and Elizabeth A. Anderlik Professor of Engineering. Her research involves international collaborations with universities in The Netherlands and France on the use of virtual reality for product design and manufacturing. Research focuses on methods to support human interaction with CAD models in an immersive virtual environment.

In 2010, Xinwei Wang had 7 journal papers published or accepted for publication in highly visible technical journals, like Journal of Physical Chemistry, Carbon, and Acta Materialia. He gave 5 invited talks at conferences or universities, and two other normal conference presentations. Two new grants were awarded from National Science Foundation and Army Research Office.

Research in Eliot Winer’s lab focusing on allowing enhanced exploration of digital medical data has been transitioned into a commercial product. It is currently being used at a major US hospital for planning radiation oncology treatments and organ transplant procedures. Dr. Winer was on research teams that attracted more than $1.5M in new funding to ISU.